Tag Archives: Stream

Our hike to Buttermilk Falls, Hamilton, Ontario

A couple of weekends ago, hubby and I decided to ignore our household chores so we could go on an Autumn hike. Where we live in Hamilton, Ontario we are blessed with numerous trails and for being known as the Waterfall Capital of the world.

Now I had only seen Buttermilk Falls from the top at Oak-Knoll Park, so it was decided we would walk down the Red Hill Trail through Upper King’s Forest Park, then hike through the forest and stream to reach the falls (there is no trail to follow). At times the walk was quite treacherous, as you are climbing over fallen trees, up hills, down hills, and over plenty of rocks. Overall though the hike was a lot of fun, and once we reached Buttermilk we were able to stand under the falls.

Here are just a few of the pictures we took:

Autumn Leaves

Upper Kings Forest Park

Cocoa tried to go north, when we had to go west.

Cocoa tried to go north, when we had to go west.

Bear running upstream

Bear running upstream.

Another view of the stream

There was very little water coming from the falls.

Image of the rocky landscape.

The rocky landscape, the entire hike was pretty much like this picture.

Fungi

I love taking pictures of fungi.

We had to take a couple selfie to send to the kids.

We had to take a couple selfie to send to the kids.

Is Matt contemplating, or playing on his phone while he waits for me to catch up.

Is Matt contemplating, or playing on his phone while he waits for me to catch up.

Cocoa walking towards Buttermilk Falls.

Cocoa walking towards Buttermilk Falls. At the top is Oak-Knoll Park.

Standing behind the falls

I am standing behind the falls as I took this picture of Matt.

Matt and the dogs underneath the falls

Matt and the dogs underneath the falls

Looking up from behind the falls

Looking up from behind the falls

I fell through the ice

The weather has been up and down lately, cold, warm, snow, rain, etc., you really never know what to wear when you leave the house. However this past Tuesday, the weather was warm enough that I decided to wear my running shoes to the dog park. Now when I say warm enough, I mean around 1° Celsius, 34° Fahrenheit for my American followers, Canadians will leave the hat and mittens at home, put on the running shoes instead of winter boots, and leave our coat zipper down. The ground was still frozen, so I wasn’t worried about muddy shoes or paws.

The dogs were running here and there, well Cocoa was mostly walking beside me, until he would see another dog that he decided was a threat to Bear. Cocoa is Bear’s bodyguard, which is quite funny, being that Cocoa is half the size of him, and certainly cannot run anywhere near as fast as Bear can. Cocoa also doesn’t really understand Bear play fighting with other dogs, he thinks Bear is being hurt, so he is right there to defend him.

We rarely take more than two walks around the entire dog park because of Cocoa’s arthritis, and of course mine. Lately we haven’t been doing the usual circle because this leash free dog park is prone to flooding, so there is a lot of water on the ground after the snow melts. Then of course the ground freezes again, leaving ice everywhere. On this particular day, I saw the dogs running across the ice so I figured it would hold me too. Ha! (Afterthought: the combined weight of Bear and Cocoa is less than what I weigh).

I put my one foot on the ice, it holds, I put my other foot on the ice, and then I start to hear the cracks. (Now before I scare the heck out of my readers, this is a very, very small creek that I am crossing, most could run and hop over it, but I can’t; it is also only a foot or so deep). My right foot falls through the ice, seconds later left goes under. My right is wet up to the middle of my shin, whereas the left is only wet up to my ankle. I easily pull my right up out of the ice, but my left is more difficult. The ice is broken like shards of glass, and they are poking into my ankle. Thankfully my thick sock and jeans are protecting my ankle from being cut. I finally get my foot out of the water, but both my feet are now frozen solid. The walk is over, and I’m off home to warm up.

Note to self: next time remember the dogs are lighter than I.