Meziadin Provincial Park, British Columbia Day 17

This morning was spent searching for Matt’s car keys, not in the tent, not in the car, he then retraced his steps on the walk we had taken the night before, with the sincere hope they did not fall into the “shitter” as Matt said (otherwise known as the outhouse). Eventually he had to do his morning ‘business’, and that is when he found his keys – ‘they were stuck in his underwear of all places!’ Happy as clams, we jumped for joy, just in time to see a float plane land in the water!

We left Boya Lake Provincial Park at 9:15, mileage 7008.3. On our drive we saw two red foxes, and two more black bears, one munching on berries, another crossing the road appearing to smile at us.

Looking for the perfect wild strawberry
Looking for the perfect wild strawberry.
The bear appears to be smiling
The bear appears to be smiling.

As we passed Dease Lake, the road turned to gravel, we really were in the interior.

A cloudy day in the interior.
A cloudy day in the interior.

We arrived at our destination around 4:30pm, it had been a long drive that day. We were lucky to be able to find a campsite that day, we camped at site #9, on the third level with a beautiful view of the lake, and snow capped mountains. Meziadin Lake Provincial Park is a well maintained campground, there were even hanging baskets of flowers outside of the outhouses. Raspberry bushes everywhere, which of course, meant there was a bear wondering the area, and bear bangers going off every so often. We met a group of bicycle riders, they averaged about 40 miles per day (they were from the United States, thus miles not kilometres).

View from our campsite Meziadin Lake Provincial Park
View from our campsite Meziadin Lake Provincial Park.
Meziadin Lake Provincial Park
Meziadin Lake Provincial Park.
Meziadin Lake Provincial Park_2
Meziadin Lake Provincial Park.
Meziadin Lake Provincial Park
Meziadin Lake Provincial Park.
Bicyclists at Meziadin Lake
Bicyclists camping at Meziadin Lake.

When we walked around the park, we met people from Germany, and two gentlemen from England who had brought their own vehicle to Canada! I can’t even imagine the cost??

Day 14 Liard Hot Springs & off to the Yukon

Our starting mileage for the day was 5601 kilometres. Officially we had spent two weeks on the road. We had a couple destinations in mind, Liard River Hot Springs Provincial Park, then Watson Lake Campground in the Yukon.

When we woke in the morning the temperature was only 7 Celsius, which is not what we were used to for the middle of July, but then again, we were in Northern British Columbia. As we headed back out to the highway to start our drive, the sun was shining bright, and by 10:20 a.m. the temperature had risen to 17 Celsius. On our drive, we saw quite a bit of wildlife, our bear count rose to eight, six black bears, and two brown bears.

Bighorn Sheep
Bighorn sheep Lamb
Reindeer
We happened upon a Reindeer taking a tinkle.
Two reindeers
Black Bear
Brown Bear

We arrived at Liard River Hot Springs around lunchtime, and our first thought, was we wished we had booked a campsite there! Sadly the campground was full, but we were still able to visit the hot spring. This hot spring was completely different from Miette Hot Springs, in that it is a natural spring. First you take a walk along a boardwalk through a boreal spruce forest before arriving at the spring which is also surrounded by the boreal forest. The water temperature ranges from 42 to 52 Celsius!

As you meander through the river, the leaves in the trees are rustling, there are birds fluttering around, singing to each other, and if you are lucky enough you may see a marmot sunning him/herself on the boardwalk, which we did!

Enjoying the hot spring at Liard River Hot Spring Provincial Park.
Enjoying the hot spring at Liard River Hot Spring Provincial Park. I was unable to enter the top of the hot spring, it was just far to hot for me.
The much cooler end of the hot spring.
The much cooler end of the hot spring.
A marmot
A marmot.

After swimming around in the hot spring, we were exhausted from the heat of the water, and smelled horribly of rotten eggs! The water does not have the most pleasant odor, but the heat makes up for it. We felt totally relaxed afterwards, and actually dreaded getting back in the car again, when we both just really needed a nap.

The drive to Watson Lake Territorial Campground, took us up through British Columbia, into the Yukon, back into British Columbia, then up to the Yukon again. Two different time zones along a very curvy stretch of highway.

Sign post forest Watson Lake, Yukon

We camped at site #29 at Watson Lake, the campsite was fabulous, but at the same time it felt like I was in the Alfred Hitchcock movie The Birds with the extremely watchful ravens and grey jays encircling us. The ravens observed every move we made, until they were satisfied we were not a threat to them. It was weird.

As I walked around the camp, I met a couple from Albuquerque, New Mexico, and a talented woodcarver from Whitehorse.

Campsite at Watson Lake Territorial Campground
Campsite at Watson Lake Territorial Campground

Next destination – Whitehorse, Yukon.